Color Theory 102

Okay, now that you’re an expert on the basics of color theory, let’s dig a little deeper.

from worth1000

If you look around you, you’ll notice that not everything is a bright color. If everything was bright, I would have a perpetual headache.

from twitpaper

Speaking of, look at these speakers.

from itechnews

Anyway, back on track.

Here’s some new color theory terminology–

Saturation: the amount of color used. Fully saturated colors are as bright as possible.

from pica

Desaturated colors have a lot of grey in them and appear more dull.

Here’s an example of a very saturated yellow:

saturated yellow

That’s really bright.

Here’s a somewhat saturated blue/green:

saturated

And the desaturated version:

desaturated

Got it?

Now value

–value is defined as the relative lightness or darkness of a color. It can be broken down into tints and shades.

Tint: when you add white to a color to make it lighter

Shade: when you add black to a color to make it darker

Here’s a visual example of value through tints and shades:

Original color:

original

Tint (white added):

lighter value

Shade (black added):

darker value

Here’s another series of examples:

Original:

original

Tint:

lighter value

Shade:

darker value

Make sense?

Moving on to contrast. This is easy. You already know this.

Complementary colors have the highest contrast. But contrast can weaken if your complementary colors are very desaturated or are light tints.

Here’s a helpful graphic:

from lighthouse

Ready for some more helpful graphics?

from worqx

The above graphic illustrates moderately-high contrast, medium value,  and very saturated color.

from worqx

The above graphic illustrates high contrast, medium value (using tints and shades), and various levels of saturation.

from worqx

The above graphic illustrates moderately-low contrast, medium-light value (using tints), and various saturation levels.

Is this making sense?

Here’s 2 more for good measure.

from worqx

The above graphic illustrates  high contrast, light value (using tints and shades), and various levels of saturation.

from worqx

The above graphic illustrates moderately-low contrast, medium-dark value (using shades), and various levels of saturation.

Now, I don’t want to overburden you with loads of information (plus I’m getting a little sleepy…) so we’ll continue this in a future post. Look out for Color Theory 103: Real Life Application.

suck it, martha.

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One Comment on “Color Theory 102”

  1. April 1, 2014 at 12:32 pm #

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