Basics: Eggs Three Ways

Remember childhood?

from crazybulletin

from crazybulletin

I do. For me, it was all about the hunt.

I remember searching for the perfect “fort” in the woods,

from goodrumfive

from goodrumfive

looking for the perfect sweatshirt (it had to be comfortable while reflecting my ultra-cool personality),

from ellen

from ellen

foraging for the perfect dandelion leaves and mushrooms for a snack,

from norwichbulletin

from norwichbulletin

(if there’s a zombie apocalypse, you probably want me on your team)

creating the perfect bubble,

from politix

from politix

and reading loads of poetry books in search of the perfect poem.

from thingsmommyliedabout

from thingsmommyliedabout

(I was a bit of a nerd.)

Now, as an adult, I’m constantly on the hunt for the perfect food.

from isource

from isource

And guys, the egg is pretty close to perfect.

It’s a tiny little powerhouse of goodness. An egg contains 13 essential vitamins and minerals, heaps of protein, antioxidants, mountains of flavor, and only 70 calories.

from withsummerlove

from withsummerlove

Yup. Amazing.

And until you learn to cook an egg, you can’t call yourself a cook.

So maybe you should learn the three most basic ways to cook an egg, huh?

Now, just like with almost everything else, there are multiple ways to boil, scramble, and fry an egg. I’ll show you my way.

from torrentbutler

from torrentbutler

How to Boil an Egg

The way my mother taught me to boil an egg (boil it for 10 minutes. maybe 15.) is not the way you should boil an egg.

Sorry mom.

from spinsucks

from spinsucks

While boiled eggs are really quite easy, it’s also easy to overcook them, giving you a dark green sheath around the yolk and a slight smell of sulphur…

Okay. Gather your egg-boiling stuff:

  • eggs (use eggs that are a few days old to ensure easy peeling)
  • pot of appropriate size (don’t use a giant soup pot for 2 eggs)
  • lid
  • salt
  • water

Put your eggs in a pot.

eggs in a pot

eggs in a pot

Fill the pot with cold water until there is an inch or two of water above the eggs. Add half a teaspoon of salt.

water covering eggs

water covering eggs

Put the pot on low-to-medium heat to slowly boil the water. Beginning with cold water, using salt, and slowly boiling will all help prevent cracking.

This is what low heat looks like in my kitchen:

see? it's pretty low.

see? it’s pretty low.

Keep an eye on the pot. Once the water boils, let it boil for 30-45 seconds, then remove it from the heat, and put a lid on it.

boiling!

boiling!

Let it sit, covered and off the heat, for about 12 minutes.

lidded

lidded

Presto. Done.

Now all you need to do is run some cold water over the cooked eggs (to cool them) and peel!

impressed?

impressed?

Now make an egg salad or impress someone special with your perfectly boiled eggs.

from lifeasahuman

from lifeasahuman

_________________________________________________________________

How to Scramble an Egg

Scrambled eggs make me think of breakfast as a kid and old diners.

from donnasdiner

from donnasdiner

They’re really not hard to make. You just need to know how.

Gather:

  • eggs
  • bowl
  • fork or whisk
  • butter
  • non-stick sauté pan
  • heat-resistant spatula
  • salt
  • black pepper (if you like it)

Crack your eggs into the bowl. Make sure that there is plenty of room left over in the bowl.

eggs in a bowl

eggs in a bowl

Splash some water into the bowl. For 2 eggs do one splash. For 4 eggs to 2 splashes. Etc.

You could also do milk, which is probably more traditional, but I use water because someone once told me that the molecules of water bind with the egg molecules in a way that milk molecules don’t. Plus I don’t keep milk around. I’m more of an almond milk girl.

So do your water splashing thing.

Whisk the water and eggs vigorously. This is why you’re using a big ol’ bowl.

beginning to whisk

beginning to whisk

Whisking the eggs and water lets air into the mixture; the more air you whisk in, the fluffier the eggs will be. So put some elbow grease into it!

whisked

whisked

When you’ve done your whisking, put the pan on medium-to-low heat. Put some butter in the pan (maybe half a tablespoon?), spreading it around so it gets all over the bottom of the pan. Leave no part unbuttered!

buttered

butter–remember, spread it all around!

Once the butter starts to bubble a little, pour the eggs into the pan.

poured

poured

Now here’s the hard part: don’t touch them yet.

Let the bottom of the eggs set, then, using your spatula, gently push one edge of the eggs to the center of the pan, letting the gooey eggs on top drain to the newly evacuated area.

pushing them

pushing them around

Do this again on another side of the eggs.

Keep doing this until there is no liquid left. Don’t be aggressive with the eggs at all.

starts to cooks

starts to cooks

If you’re going to add any extras into the the eggs, now is the time to do it. Think:

  • cheese
  • bacon
  • green onions
  • mushrooms
  • etc.

I chose to add red peppers and sautéed onions.

add-ins

add-ins

Now gently and tenderly keep the eggs moving, trying not to break them up too much.

When there is no more raw egg–and before you see any brown–remove from the heat and slide onto a plate.

Sprinkle with salt & pepper if desired. I never add the s & p until the very end.

Done!

yum

yum

_________________________________________________________________

How to Fry an Egg

I hate runny whites.

If you serve me an egg with runny white, I will make the “yech” face and push it away.

from youngaudiencesindiana

from youngaudiencesindiana

I probably won’t even say thank you for the hard work you put into ruining my egg.

So…if you ever make me an egg, make sure the whites are cooked.

Please.

from tvtropes

from tvtropes

To properly fry an egg (according to the rules of Captain Anna), get out the following:

  • 2 eggs (1 is never enough)
  • butter
  • smallish saute pan
  • spatula
  • salt
  • black pepper (optional, I detest the stuff)
  • lid (maybe)

Turn the heat on to low-medium. Turn it up high and you’ll regret it.

Put your pan on the heat.

little cast iron skillet

little cast iron skillet

I decided to use my trusty little cast iron skillet.

Put some butter in the pan. Use a little bit more than you think you should.

butter

butter

Let it melt, spreading it around with your spatula.

all spread around

all spread around

Once the butter bubbles a little, crack the eggs into the pan. If you can, take care to keep the yolk intact.

yolks intact...check

yolks intact…check

Unless you’re making an egg for El Guapo, in which case you make every effort to burst the yolk. The man doesn’t like a runny yolk. It’s amazing our relationship has lasted this long.

After the eggs are in the hot butter, you’re basically done, though you do have choice now. There are two basic techniques–to flip, or not to flip.

Technique #1: Not to Flip

Keep an eye on it, but don’t touch it.

almost done!

almost done!

When the whites are set and the edges start to curl up, it’s done.

edges beginning to curl

edges beginning to curl

If the edges start to curl before the whites are set and no longer clear, pop the lid on for a minute or two. It’ll keep the heat trapped in the pan and cook the tops.

That technique will give you an egg that looks like this:

from thekitchn

from thekitchn

It’s soft, and great for putting on salads, meats, burgers, hash browns, whatever really.

This is called “sunny side up.”

from mastermarf

from mastermarf

Technique #2: To Flip

So the egg is in the pan, wallowing in all that butter.

wallowing

wallowing

When the whites are almost set (still a little clear and runny on top) and the edges look like they’re about to curl up, slip the spatula under under the egg and gently flip the egg over.

Not with a splat.

Not with a plomp.

Not with a kerplink.

You want to gently, gently, flip with over with a quiet…splish. Let it paddle around in all that extra butter you threw in the pan (or olive oil…if you must).

starting the flip

starting the flip

You can’t see it clearly in the above picture, because I poorly planned this little egg making adventure and used a black spatula, which blended in with the cast iron skillet.

Rookie mistake. I should know better, right?

Okay, let the egg simmer for about 30 seconds and then give the area above the yolk a little poke with your spatula. If it wiggles and seems like if you poked it too hard it might burst all over the place, you’re done!

poking

poking

it's done

it’s done

Slide the egg out of the pan with your spatula on to a plate, taking care not to puncture the yolk.

sliding

sliding

Season with salt and pepper, if you desire.

This is what is called an “egg over medium.”

breakfast. or lunch. or dinner.

breakfast. or lunch. or dinner.

Congratulations!

from sodahead

from sodahead

Now if you’re one of those weird folks who likes their yolks hard and dry, leave the flipped egg cooking for a minute or so.

Give it another little poke with your spatula. When the yolk stops being squishy and lovely and burst-y and is more like a hard piece of golf ball, you’re done.

You now have an “egg over well.”

Congratulations.

The only reason for an egg over well is if you’re planning on eating it on a sandwich in the car.

Ever tried to eat a runny egg in the car? You’re practically guaranteed to need to change clothes.

from thedistractionnetwork

from thedistractionnetwork

So that’s how to make eggs three ways. Now gird up your loins and go cook an egg!

Maybe without the girding.

suck it, martha.

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Categories: Food & Drink, Life, Tips

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