Chicken-Fried Venison

My job can get crazy sometimes.

from acidcow

from acidcow

Yep. Crazier than two men and two sheep on a motorbike.

And sometimes it can me ME crazy.

from jamesaltucher

from jamesaltucher

But it’s got its perks.

I learned how to make the best omelet of my life from Yankee Bitch, who I am delighted to sit next to every day. (read about that amazing omelet and see the step by step here)

yankee bitch's omelet

yankee bitch’s omelet

I now know more about asbestos than I ever thought I would.

from howstuffworks

from howstuffworks

I can lay carpet tiles.

from mythreecentsopinion

from mythreecentsopinion

And I have a terrific co-worker who gave me an aged venison ham, from a deer shot by his daughter.

venison ham

venison ham

So I spent the afternoon yesterday butchering that venison ham.

cutting up venison ham

cutting up venison ham

I felt a little like Dexter.

from morbidlyamusing

from morbidlyamusing

Only instead of packing the flesh into plastic bags and dumping them into the Atlantic, I used this handy stuff.

so handy

so handy

According to the packaging, it can also be used for crafts.

hmmmmmm.......

crafty

Hmmmm…….

Anyway, I ended up dividing the venison ham up into several different freezer packages for future use.

packages

packages

Since I felt a calling back to my country roots, I first used the package earmarked for cubed steak.

dinner

dinner

I had cut this meat specifically to be pounded out.

ready to pound

ready to pound

So I laid down some plastic wrap on the counter, then put one of the pieces of meat on it, then covered it with another piece of plastic wrap (to keep the blood from spraying. Because I’m really not Dexter.).

ready to pound it!

ready to pound it!

Using the pointy-knobby side of the tenderizer, pound away.

If you’ve got some aggression built up, this is probably the best kitchen activity for you.

I had a blast.

pounded

pounded

When it’s done, it should be thinner and flatter than when you started. And thusly, more tender.

Put each pounded piece of meat into a bowl.

bowl o' meat

bowl o’ meat

Once you’ve pounded out each piece and they’re all in the bowl, sprinkle some garlic on the meat and then cover it all with buttermilk.

covered in buttermilk

covered in buttermilk

The garlic helps flavor the meat and the buttermilk helps to tenderize and cut down on the gamey-ness. I had no idea if this was an old deer, a male deer, or a deer that ran a bunch right before it died, so I wasn’t going to take any chances.

I let it soak for a couple of hours.

When it was almost dinner time, I put a couple of cups of flour in a dish (I like to use Pyrex because it lets me be sloppy and not be too messy).

flour

flour

I added several really good shakes of seasoning salt, some black pepper, a little paprika, some garlic powder, and a pinch of cayenne to the flour.

seasoned flour

seasoned flour

Then I set up my assembly line: buttermilk-soaked meat, flour, clean plate.

assembly line

assembly line

I removed a piece of meat from the buttermilk and let it drip for a second,

dripping meat

dripping meat

then dipped it into the flour mixture, dredging on both sides.

dredging

dredging

Then I put the meat on the clean plate.

plated

plated

Once each piece was dredged, I dipped each one individually back into the buttermilk,

back into the buttermilk

back into the buttermilk

then dredged it into the flour again.

back into the flour

back into the flour

Then it went back onto the plate.

double dredged

double dredged

Once all of the meat was double dredged, I heated up some canola oil in my trusty cast iron skillet.

heating up oil

heating up oil

Once the oil was piping hot, I carefully laid three of the meat pieces in the sizzling oil.

sizzling

sizzling

I let the meat fry until golden brown on both sides, then carefully removed them from the oil and let them drain on a plate.

Don’t worry if some of the crumby goodness is left in the skillet. We’ll take care of that in a minute.

chicken-fried venison

chicken-fried venison

After all of the meat fried, the only logical thing to do was to make gravy.

I drained off a little of the grease, so that there was only about 1/4 cup in the pan.

grease

grease

Then I took 1/3 cup of flour and added it to the grease, stirring constantly.

flour

flour

flour in grease

flour in grease

Whisk constantly until the roux is darker than when you started.

darker roux

darker roux

Then pour in about a cup of milk.

pouring milk

pouring milk

Whisk that until it’s thoroughly combined, and don’t stop whisking.

constant whisking

constant whisking

Slowly add about another cup of milk.

more milk

more milk

Keep whisking! Don’t stop! You’re so close!

As you’re faithfully wielding that whisk, add salt, pepper, and whatever other spices toot your horn.

When you’re done, the gravy should look kind of like this:

gravy

gravy

And you should pour it all over that hot piece of chicken fried venison.

gravy covered meat

gravy covered meat

Maybe serve with a nice casserole of some sort.

dinner

dinner

suck it, martha

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Categories: Food & Drink

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